Ap Gov Project

Um.. this is my project. I emailed it to you, but I'm going to post it here as well to be safe.

Ethan Burwell, AP Government, Media Project, January 14, 2011

Loaded language:
-words used to persuade people of something without actually making a clear argument.

The article addresses California's health care policies, but displays loaded language in stating that the state is not quite the "trailblazer" that it once was. The article also refers to California as a "renegade." It also implies that supports of California's health care are cheerleaders waving their "pompoms." (Varney. "California Embraces New Health Care Law.")

Muckraking:
-searching through the activities of public officials or organizations seeking to expose conduct contrary to the public interest.

Using a combination of strongly loaded language and an almost argumentative perspective, the article greatly focuses on the inadequacies of White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley; seeking to raise question about his qualifications for his current position. (Kim. "The Nation: The Too-Big-To-Fail President.")

Trial Balloon:
-testing public interest in a policy by making it known.

The article, an interview with Senator Durbin, discusses a potential deal to temporarily extend the Bush-era tax cuts. In the article, Derbin mentioned several alternatives to the compromise that the deficit commission had worked on, including more stimulus and decreasing payroll taxes. (All Things Considered. "Illinois Sen. Durbin Weighs In On Midterm Results." )

Adversarial Coverage:
-embarrassing/negative news coverage.

The article details how former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was sentenced to jail time for illegally funneling corporate money. The article is adversarial because it exposes both embarrassing and negative content. (The Associated Press. "Ex-Rep. Tom DeLay Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison.")

Slanted News:
-news favoring one stance over another.

The article reports on how Sarah Palin would stack up in a presidential race against Obama. The article sells its self by advertising that Democrats should hope that Palin would receive the nominee, as in such an even the Republicans are destine to fail. It is solidly slanted towards liberal view in that conservatives probably wouldn’t even go as far as to mention an article along such lines. (Snyder. "Democrats Should Hope For Palin's Run.")

Sound bite:
-an audio/video clip of a politician speaking.

The story reports on Obama’s new top economic adviser. It features an eleven second sound bite, in which Obama explains the need to make the government more competitive in order to encourage job growth. (Horsley. "Obama Names New Top Economic Adviser)

Agenda setting:
-the influence of the elite to effect what the media choose to cover.

The decision of the senate to repeal "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" cause the media to shift their agenda and to focus on the topic. Between December 18th, when the vote was cast to make the repeal, and December 22, when it was signed by Obama, the media built an agenda on covering the issue. In that time period several, likely previously unscheduled reports were released, each approaching the issue from a different angle including what repercussions it would have, what Obama’s opinion had been, as well as how military personnel felt on the issue. This sudden change in focus demonstrated the ability of the media to set an agenda in covering a topic, and the ability of politicians to influence that agenda. (Memmott. "After 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Is Repealed, What's Next?) (Sharpino. "Where Does Obama Stand With Gay Voters?) (NPR. "Soldiers Mixed On 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Repeal.")

Gatekeeper:
-the media controls the importance of issues based on the amount of coverage.

After WikiLeaks released thousands of sensitive government documents the media devoted much coverage to the issue. Numerous article were presented by National Public Radio to investigate the issue and for a while it was addressed more than any other issue, including issues that could have been more related to the average listener. (Temple-Raston, Dina. "WikiLeaks Release Reveals Messier Side Of Diplomacy." )

Scorekeeping:
-media acts to keep a track record of politicians and also influences who gets elected.

The article details the clashing characters of politicians Paul Ryan and Chris Van Hollen who were considered to be two rising stars in budget debates. It goes into depth not only on their individual backgrounds and policies, but it compares ways in which each should be able to stack up and clash with the other. (Stiles. "National Review: Budget Showdown Ahead)

Watchdog:
-close scrutiny by the media that often involves investigation of both political records and personal lives.

The article looks at and publicizes accusations brought against Christine O’Donnell. It brings out numerous mishaps and potential embarrassments that O’Donnell has faced not only in her recent run for the senate, but going back as far as her early career and college days as well. (Seabrook. "Questions Surround Del. Senate Hopeful O'Donnell)


Analysis:

I found the coverage and presentation of National Public Radio to be more news, opposed to editorial. Much of it’s content involved investigative reporting in which a number of people needed to be contacted or cited.
It matters how much is news or editorial because it will shape the way people respond. And editorial piece is more likely to incite opinion and thus sway listeners, where as news does more to report on what actually happened relaying predominantly facts.

I would expect both conservatives and liberals to be fairly content with their coverage/presentation. The news editorials seemed to make take an initiative to cover both sides of the spectrum about equally, however, the wide spectrum of coverage seemed to lean slightly more liberal; opinionated articles could be found supporting both sides. Shows were also largely sponsored by local businesses thus suggesting a more liberal aspect. Non-political coverage included a wide array of multicultural and artistic programming, also suggesting a more liberal networking.

Compare and contrast:

The weekly media was much more investigative than the Sunday media which focused more on opinion.
The Sunday media featured extensive interviews to get the opinions of both politicians and viewers.
Both conservatives, and liberals, were represented in the opinion sharing, however in some cases the interviewers seemed to identify more with the more liberal opinions, in that it seemed to take more effort for some conservatives to convey their opinions.

Intended audience: typical, probably working people. The content was that which the average voter should know, and most adds were sponsored by fairly local regional businesses, as well as larger businesses that deal with the average person.

I would expect Bush and Obama to respond reasonably to both these media, especially the investigative weekly news, which did a fairly good job of avoiding a bias. Regarding the Sunday media, after looking at the more liberal aspects mentioned here and in the analysis, a Democratic leader would probably feel slightly more comfortable in the NPR setting, than would a Republican leader.

Work Cited

All Things Considered. "Illinois Sen. Durbin Weighs In On Midterm Results." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 6 Dec. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=131048558>.

Horsley, Scott. "Obama Names New Top Economic Adviser." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 7 Jan. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2011/01/07/132743590/obama-names-new-top-economic-adviser>.

Kim, Richard. "The Nation: The Too-Big-To-Fail President." National Public Radio. 7 Jan. 2011. Web. 10 Jan. 2011. <http://www.npr.org/2011/01/07/132732475/the-nation-the-too-big-to-fail- president>.

Memmott, Mark. "After 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Is Repealed, What's Next?" NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 22 Dec. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/12/22/132253751/after-dont-ask-dont-tell-is-repealed-whats-next>.

NPR. "Soldiers Mixed On 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Repeal." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 20 Dec. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2010/12/20/132210120/soldiers-mixed-on-dont-ask-dont-tell-repeal>.

Seabrook, Andrea. "Questions Surround Del. Senate Hopeful O'Donnell." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 15 Sept. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129888759>.

Sharpino, Al. "Where Does Obama Stand With Gay Voters?" NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 20 Dec. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2010/12/20/132195766/Where-Does-Obama-Stand-With-Gay-Voters>.

Snyder, Deron. "Democrats Should Hope For Palin's Run." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 8 Nov. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=131158177>.

Stiles, Andrew. "National Review: Budget Showdown Ahead." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 30 Nov. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2010/11/30/131690692/national-review-budget-showdown-ahead>.

Temple-Raston, Dina. "WikiLeaks Release Reveals Messier Side Of Diplomacy." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 28 Dec. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2010/11/28/131648175/wikileaks-releases-huge-cache-of-u-s-diplomatic-cables>.

The Associated Press. "Ex-Rep. Tom DeLay Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 10 Jan. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2011/01/11/132811185/ex-congressman-delay-gets-3-years-prison-sentence>.

Varney, Sarah. "California Embraces New Health Care Law." NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. 7 Jan. 2010. Web. 10 Jan. 2011.< http://www.npr.org/2011/01/07/132717031/california-embraces-new-health-care-law >.

**The Associated Press was mentioned frequently both in NPR online reports and radio broadcasts, but has no need for any citation in this project.

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